Wooden Photo Albums NEW ZEALAND TIMBER PRODUCTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We live in the beautiful Bay of Island and are one of the few manufactures whose

owners have hands on in the workshop

 

NZ Timber Products Ltd

 

John & Kathy Rowley

 

New Zealand Timber Products became ours from 15th November 2007 and it was Johnís experience with woodcraft that enabled us to buy New Zealand Timber Products. Although Rimu is not native to the UK, John has adapted his knowledge of European wood to enable him to make the wooden photo albums and guest books.

 

Rimu products are rare in the UK so our first encounter of the Rimu albums was on one of our holidays in the South Island of New Zealand. We saw the photo albums and loved the heart Rimuís beautiful figured grain so bought a Rimu photo album for a memento of our visit to New Zealand. We did not see the Kauri photo albums or guest book till we came to live in the North Island  

 

Swamp Kauri photo albums and guest books are a new venture for NZTP but we think they compliment the Rimu albums admirably. We love the subtle tones of Swamp Kauri and the way it changes when viewed in different light, rather like a hologram.  Both Rimu and Kauri are hard woods but Kauri responds differently during manufacturing than Rimu so with three different sizes of albums and the landscape guest book there is never a dull moment in our work shop when making the wooden albums.

 

Producing the Rimu and Kauri albums is only part of the process as we both derive much pleasure in communicating with people, helping them to select a suitable album for their special occasion. Also we can often help with special requirements such as personalised engraving and emblems. Even custom albums are sometimes possible where a standard album is not suitable.

 

We are very enthusiastic about the Natural New Zealand bush and greatly enjoy walks in the forest to see all the different trees and plants. We donít have bush in the UK so itís good to know that steps are being taken to preserve the remaining wild landscape.

 

We admire the way the Maoris, used the forest as their Ďsupermarketí, and the tenacity of the later settlers who travel half the way round the world to get here.  We intend to develop a series of new emblems for special albums to commemorate these events and the numerous uses of the plants and trees that go to make up the bush